lisour:

mirandaharmony:

mirandaharmony:

Love, love, love. 

Morning reblog!

Platonic love too

lisour:

mirandaharmony:

mirandaharmony:

Love, love, love. 

Morning reblog!

Platonic love too

annabellioncourt:

There’s a lovely old English myth that if someone who truely loved and trusted the werewolf called it by name that it would turn back to human.
Others include throwing their human clothes at it and it’d turn back but that’s a bit less romantic

annabellioncourt:

There’s a lovely old English myth that if someone who truely loved and trusted the werewolf called it by name that it would turn back to human.

Others include throwing their human clothes at it and it’d turn back but that’s a bit less romantic

(Source: danielodowd, via wolf-in-the-fold)

raspbeary:

some addams kids cause theyre hella fun to draw

(via betweencaffeineandnicotine)

comicsalliance:

MARGUERITE SAUVAGE’S WONDER WOMAN AND THE SLOWLY CHANGING FACE OF COMIC BOOK FASHION
By Juliet Kahn
Fashion matters. Your experience with superhero comics might have led you to believe otherwise, but I assure you, fashion matters—and should matter particularly to people who read, write, and/or draw comics. Crazy, right? Who would have guessed that such an omnipresent element of our daily lives, used to communicate everything from our politics to our career goals to the circumstances of our laundry cycle should be of consequence to a visual medium!

Fashion—by which I mean all clothes and all styles, not just what you might find folded in the juniors’ department—is capable of communicating basically anything to the audience. A character’s unemployment might be evidenced through their yoga pants and ponytail; their ambition through their pressed pantsuit; their hobbies through a paint-flecked smock. Generally, American comics get those most basic of rules right, but anything beyond that—anything not strictly tied to a vocation or place—is fumbled. Clothes are bland when they aren’t embarrassingly out of date. Women’s fashion is a bizarre mélange of male fantasies, ranging from obvious fetishwear to….heavily fetishized selections from the 2007 Delia’s catalog. Thong straps are hiked high above brutally low-waisted jeans, high heels are worn with absolutely everything, and crop tops are issued upon the first sign of puberty. I mean, I say this as someone who owns two: they aren’t that popular.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

MARGUERITE SAUVAGE’S WONDER WOMAN AND THE SLOWLY CHANGING FACE OF COMIC BOOK FASHION

By Juliet Kahn

Fashion matters. Your experience with superhero comics might have led you to believe otherwise, but I assure you, fashion matters—and should matter particularly to people who read, write, and/or draw comics. Crazy, right? Who would have guessed that such an omnipresent element of our daily lives, used to communicate everything from our politics to our career goals to the circumstances of our laundry cycle should be of consequence to a visual medium!

Fashion—by which I mean all clothes and all styles, not just what you might find folded in the juniors’ department—is capable of communicating basically anything to the audience. A character’s unemployment might be evidenced through their yoga pants and ponytail; their ambition through their pressed pantsuit; their hobbies through a paint-flecked smock. Generally, American comics get those most basic of rules right, but anything beyond that—anything not strictly tied to a vocation or place—is fumbled. Clothes are bland when they aren’t embarrassingly out of date. Women’s fashion is a bizarre mélange of male fantasies, ranging from obvious fetishwear to….heavily fetishized selections from the 2007 Delia’s catalog. Thong straps are hiked high above brutally low-waisted jeans, high heels are worn with absolutely everything, and crop tops are issued upon the first sign of puberty. I mean, I say this as someone who owns two: they aren’t that popular.

READ MORE

annavonsyfert:

100000% sarcasm comic because I’m tired of being told I have sucky self-confidence when I already know that, but I don’t know what to do about it!!

pigeonbits:

A little sketchbook diary comic I drew today.  I get the feeling a lot of people go through this, adjuncts or not.

CUDDLE FUDDLE by DEDDY